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Services Offered by Orthopedic Associates P.A .

If you don’t see what you are looking for, please call us at (505) 327-1400. We’ll be glad to help!

Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy (also called arthroscopic surgery) is a minimally invasive surgical procedure on a joint in which an examination and sometimes treatment of damage is performed using anarthroscope, an endoscope that is inserted into the joint through a small incision. Arthroscopic procedures can be performed to evaluate or treat many orthopaedic conditions including torn cartilage (known by doctors as "meniscus"), torn surface (articular) cartilage, ACL reconstruction, and trimming damaged cartilage. The advantage over traditional open surgery is that the joint does not have tobe opened upfully. For knee arthroscopy only two small incisions are made, one for the arthroscope and one for the surgical instruments tobe used in the knee cavity. This reduces recovery time and may increase the rate of success due to less trauma to the connective tissue. Itis especially useful for professional athletes, who frequently injure knee joints and require fast healing time. There isalso less scarring, because of the smaller incisions. Irrigation fluid is used to distend the joint and make a surgical space. Sometimes this fluid leaks (extravasates) into the surrounding soft tissue, causing edema.

(Source: Wikipedia)

Foot & Ankle Care

Podiatrists are the most qualified doctors to care for your feet. They complete four years of training in a podiatric medical school and three years of hospital residency training. This training is similar to that of other doctors. Podiatrists can specialize in many fields, including surgery, sports medicine, wound care, pediatrics, and diabetic care. Feet are complex anatomical structures, all-in-one stabilizers, shock absorbers, and propulsion engines that are instrumental to overall health and well-being. They require expert care. Be sure you’re seeing the most qualified health-care professional to treat your feet by a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine (DPM). The DPM means a physician has completed years of extensive foot and ankle medical and surgical training in podiatric medical school and hospital-based residency training, making him uniquely qualified to care for your specialized needs. Both Podiatrists at Orthopedic Associates are Board Certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery.

(Source: American Podiatric Medical Association)

Fracture Care

A fracture is a broken bone. A bone may be completely fractured or partially fractured in any number of ways (crosswise, lengthwise, in multiple pieces).

Bones are rigid, but they do bend or "give" somewhat when an outside force is applied. However, if the force is too great, the bones will break, just as a plastic ruler breaks when it is bent too far.

The severity of a fracture usually depends on the force that caused the break. If the bone's breaking point has been exceeded only slightly, then the bone may crack rather than break all the way through. If the force is extreme, such as in an automobile crash or a gunshot, the bone may shatter.

If the bone breaks in such a way that bone fragments stick out through the skin, or a wound penetrates down to the broken bone, the fracture is called an "open" fracture. This type of fracture is particularly serious because once the skin is broken, infection in both the wound and the bone can occur.

  • Common types of fractures include:
  • Stable fracture. The broken ends of the bone line up and are barely out of place.
  • Open, compound fracture. The skin may be pierced by the bone or by a blow that breaks the skin at the time of the fracture. The bone may or may not be visible in the wound.
  • Transverse fracture. This type of fracture has a horizontal fracture line.
  • Oblique fracture. This type of fracture has an angled pattern.
  • Comminuted fracture. In this type of fracture, the bone shatters into three or more pieces.
  • The most common causes of fractures are:
  • A fall, a motor vehicle accident, or a tackle during a football game can all result in fractures.
  • This disorder weakens bones and makes them more likely to break.
  • Repetitive motion can tire muscles and place more force on bone. This can result in stress fractures. Stress fractures are more common in athletes.
  • Many fractures are very painful and may prevent you from moving the injured area. Other common symptoms include:
  • Swelling and tenderness around the injury
  • Bruising
  • Deformity — a limb may look "out of place" or a part of the bone may puncture through the skin

Doctors use a variety of treatments to treat fractures:

Cast Immobilization

A plaster or fiberglass cast is the most common type of fracture treatment, because most broken bones can heal successfully once they have been repositioned and a cast has been applied to keep the broken ends in proper position while they heal.

Functional Cast or Brace

The cast or brace allows limited or "controlled" movement of nearby joints. This treatment is desirable for some, but not all, fractures.

Traction

Traction is usually used to align a bone or bones by a gentle, steady pulling action.

External Fixation

In this type of operation, metal pins or screws are placed into the broken bone above and below the fracture site. The pins or screws are connected to a metal bar outside the skin. This device is a stabilizing frame that holds the bones in the proper position while they heal.

In cases where the skin and other soft tissues around the fracture are badly damaged

Open Reduction and Internal Fixation

During this operation, the bone fragments are first repositioned (reduced) in their normal alignment, and then held together with special screws or by attaching metal plates to the outer surface of the bone. The fragments may also be held together by inserting rods down through the marrow space in the center of the bone.

Recovery

Fractures take several weeks to several months to heal, depending on the extent of the injury and how well you follow your doctor's advice. Pain usually stops long before the fracture is solid enough to handle the stresses of normal activity.

Even after your cast or brace is removed, you may need to continue limiting your movement until the bone is solid enough for normal activity.

During your recovery you will likely lose muscle strength in the injured area. Specific exercises will help you restore normal muscle strength, joint motion, and flexibility.

Prevention

Proper diet and exercise may help in preventing some fractures. A diet rich in calcium and Vitamin D will promote bone strength. Weightbearing exercise also helps keep bones strong.

(Source: Ortho Info http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00139)

 

Full MRI & Digital X-ray Services

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a test that uses a magnetic field and pulses of radio wave energy to make pictures of organs and structures inside the body. In many cases, MRI gives different information about structures in the body than can be seen with an X-ray, ultrasound, or computed tomography (CT) scan. MRI also may show problems that cannot be seen with other imaging methods.

For an MRI test, the area of the body being studied is placed inside a special machine that contains a strong magnet. Pictures from an MRI scan are digital images that can be saved and stored on a computer for more study. The images also can be reviewed remotely, such as in a clinic or an operating room. In some cases, contrast material may be used during the MRI scan to show certain structures more clearly.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is done for many reasons. It is used to find problems such as tumors, bleeding, injury, blood vessel diseases, or infection. MRI also may be done to provide more information about a problem seen on an X-ray, ultrasound scan, or CT scan. Contrast material may be used during MRI to show abnormal tissue more clearly. An MRI scan can be done for the:

Head. MRI can look at the brain for tumors, an aneurysm, bleeding in the brain, nerve injury, and other problems, such as damage caused by a stroke. MRI can also find problems of the eyes and optic nerves , and the ears and auditory nerves.

Chest. MRI of the chest can look at the heart, the valves, and coronary blood vessels . It can show if the heart or lungs are damaged. MRI of the chest may also be used to look for breast cancer.

Blood vessels. Using MRI to look at blood vessels and the flow of blood through them is called magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). It can find problems of the arteries and veins, such as an aneurysm, a blocked blood vessel, or the torn lining of a blood vessel (dissection). Sometimes contrast material is used to see the blood vessels more clearly.

Abdomen and pelvis. MRI can find problems in the organs and structures in the belly, such as the liver, gallbladder, pancreas, kidneys, and bladder. It is used to find tumors, bleeding, infection, and blockage. In women, it can look at the uterus and ovaries. In men, it looks at the prostate.

Bones and joints. MRI can check for problems of the bones and joints, such as arthritis, problems with the temporomandibular joint , bone marrow problems, bone tumors, cartilage problems, torn ligaments or tendons, or infection. MRI may also be used to tell if a bone is broken when X-ray results are not clear. MRI is done more commonly than other tests to check for some bone and joint problems.

Spine. MRI can check the discs and nerves of the spine for conditions such as spinal stenosis, disc bulges, and spinal tumors.

Source: WebMD - http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/magnetic-resonance-imaging-mri)

X-Ray

An X-ray is a common imaging test that has been used for decades to help doctors view the inside of the body without having to make an incision.

X-rays use small amounts of radiation. The level of exposure is considered safe for adults. However, it is not considered safe for a developing fetus. Be sure to tell your doctor before the procedure if you are pregnant or believe you could be pregnant. Your doctor may suggest a different testing method that does not use radiation, such as an MRI.

If you are having an X-ray due to a traumatic event that caused pain and possibly a broken bone, you may experience additional pain during the X-ray. The test requires you to adjust your body so that clear images can be taken. This may cause you discomfort. If you are worried, you can ask your doctor for pain medicine prior to your X-ray.

(Source: Medline Plus -= https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003337.htm)

General Orthopedics

Orthopedics is the branch of medicine that deals with the prevention and correction of injuries or disorders of the skeletal system and associated muscles, joints, and ligaments.

(Source: Dictionary.com http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/orthopedics)

Whether you have experienced the trauma of a fracture or chronic pain associated with joint, foot or ankle problems, the Doctors at Orthopedic Associates can help you return to a pain-free lifestyle.

At OA-PA, we know surgery is a big decision. Our team can help ease your fears by walking you through the entire experience, helping you know what to expect.

The team of general orthopedic surgeons on the medical staff at OA-PA specializes in:        

  • Treating ligament, cartilage or tendon injuries or arthritis in the hips, hands and other extremities
  • Repairing fractures, such as broken limbs, collarbones or kneecaps
  • Revising earlier, unsuccessful surgeries—no matter when or where the earlier procedure was performed.

When you choose the Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Services at OA-PA, all of your orthopedic needs can be addressed in one place.

It’s time to enjoy your freedom to move!

(Source: http://www.baylorhealth.com/PhysiciansLocations/Plano/SpecialtiesServices/Ortho/Pages/generalorthopedics.aspx)

Orthopedic Bracing

Orthopedic braces and orthopedic splints protect, stabilize, support and correct injuries or abnormal alignment through the process of rehabilitation and recovery. They are used in injury rehabilitation, injury prevention, osteoarthritic care, post-operative care and more. OA-PA works with you to determine the level of stability, type of support, function and fit that the orthopedic brace should provide. We recommend the best brace for you. Please make an appointment or drop by one of our locations for an expert orthopedic brace consultation and fitting. What you need is likely in stock, or we will source it for you in just days.

Our product line includes:
  • Knee braces, ankle braces, leg braces
  • Wrist braces, thumb and hand splints
  • Elbow braces, tennis elbow braces
  • Neck, back and shoulder braces
  • Hip, groin and thigh braces
  • Arch support inserts, metatarsal pads and foot insoles
  • Bunion splints
  • Orthopedic compression garments
  • Gaitwalkers and aircasts

Sports Medicine

Sport and exercise medicine doctors are specialist physicians who have completed medical school, appropriate residency training and then specialize further in sports medicine or 'sports and exercise medicine' (the preferred term). Specialization in sports medicine may be a doctor's first specialty (as in Australia, Netherlands, Norway, Italy). It may also be a sub-specialty or second specialisation following a specialisation such as physiatry or orthopedic surgery. The various approaches reflect the medical culture in different countries.

Specializing in the treatment of athletes and other physically active individuals, sports and exercise medicine physicians have extensive education in musculoskeletal medicine. SEM doctors treat injuries such as muscle, ligament, tendon and bone problems, but may also treat chronic illnesses that can affect physical performance, such as asthma and diabetes. SEM doctors also advise on managing and preventing injuries.

Specialists in SEM diagnose and treat any medical conditions which regular exercisers or sports persons encounter. The majority of a SEM physicians' time is therefore spent treating musculoskeletal injuries, however other conditions include sports cardiology issues, unexplained underperformance syndrome, exercise-induced asthma, screening for cardiac abnormalities and diabetes in sports. In addition team physicians working in elite sports often play a role in performance medicine, whereby an athletes' physiology is monitored, and aberrations corrected, in order to achieve peak physical performance. 

SEM consultants also deliver clinical physical activity interventions, negating the burden of disease directly attributable to physical inactivity and the compelling evidence for the effectiveness of exercise in the primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of disease.

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sports_medicine) 

Common sports injuries:

  • Concussion- caused by severe head injury where the brain moves violently within the skull so that brain cells all fire at once, much like a seizure
  • Muscle Cramps- a sudden tight, intense pain caused by a muscle locked in spasm. Muscle cramps are also recognized as an involuntary and forcibly contracted muscle that does not relax
  • ACL Sprains- The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a ligament involved in knee stabilization. An ACL rupture can occur when the foot is planted and the knee twists to change direction.
  • ACL Tears- The anterior cruciate ligament; one of four major knee ligament necessary for comfortable knee movement, tears, causing major pain and causes the knee to "give out". The knee ACL can tear for a number of reasons.
  • Ankle Sprain- The ligaments that hold the ankle bones in place can easily be overstretched.
  • Shin Splints- The tissue that attaches the muscles of your lower leg to the shin bone may be pulling away from the bone, or it may be inflamed from overuse.
  • Muscle Strains- tears in muscle that cause pain and loss of function

Total Joint Replacement

Total joint replacement is a surgical procedure in which parts of an arthritic or damaged joint are removed and replaced with a metal, plastic or ceramic device called a prosthesis. The prosthesis is designed to replicate the movement of a normal, healthy joint.

When Is Total Joint Replacement Recommended?

Several conditions can cause joint pain and disability and lead patients to consider joint replacement surgery. In many cases, joint pain is caused by damage to the cartilage that lines the ends of the bones (articular cartilage)—either from arthritis, a fracture, or another condition.

If nonsurgical treatments like medications, physical therapy, and changes to your everyday activities do not relieve your pain and disability, your doctor may recommend total joint replacement.

Preparing for Surgery:

In the weeks before your surgery, your surgical team and primary care doctor will spend time preparing you for your upcoming procedure. For example, your primary care doctor may check your general health, and your surgeon may require several tests — such as blood tests and a cardiogram — to help plan your surgery.

There are also many things you can do to prepare. Talk to your doctor and ask questions. Prepare yourself physically by eating right and exercising. Take steps to manage your first weeks at home by arranging for help and obtaining assistive items, such as a shower bench, handrails, or a long-handled reacher. By planning ahead, you can help ensure a smooth surgery and speedy recovery.

Recovery:

Recovery and rehabilitation will be different for each person. In general, your doctor will encourage you to use your "new" joint shortly after your operation. Although it may be challenging at times, following your doctor's instructions will speed your recovery.

Most patients will experience some temporary pain in the replaced joint because the surrounding muscles are weak from inactivity, the body is adjusting to the new joint, and the tissues are healing. This pain should resolve in a few months.

Exercise is an important part of the recovery process. Your doctor or physical therapist will provide you with specific exercises to help restore movement and strengthen the joint.

If you have any questions about limitations on your activities after total joint replacement, please consult your doctor.

(Source: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00233)


Disclaimer: Orthopedic Associates, PA offers and maintains this website to provide information of a general nature about our practice and conditions requiring the services of an orthopedic or podiatry specialist. The information is provided with the understanding that Orthopedic Associates, PA is not engaged in rendering surgical or medical advice via the web. Any information in the publications, messages, postings, or articles on this site are not considered a substitute for consultation with an orthopedic or podiatry specialist. To address individual medical needs. Individual facts and circumstances will determine the treatment that is most appropriate.
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